About

This is a blog all about ancient trees in the UK and related subjects. Authors are Jill Butler (Conservation Policy Officer at the Woodland Trust) and Ted Green (member of the Ancient Tree Forum and much more besides).

This blog was launched as there is an evident need for information on ancient trees and their importance to be available to the public in order to ensure their preservation.

15 Responses so far »

  1. 1

    Guy Herremans said,

    Dear Ted and Jill,

    wauw…great webside !!! later more about that.

    I am Guy from Belgium and we med the last time on the the mariage of Gerard and Garmina in Madrid.

    We spook about visiting UK trees and bees with mostly Belgium arborists.

    My question is the next: Is it still possible to come over with a group in week25 ? If sombody experienced in the managegment of ancient trees could talke about the do’s and dont’s than you may let me know please.

    And how can we discus the details the best, by mail, pidgen, …?

    My Telnr. 0032 486.89.09.23

    friendly green greeds,
    Guy & Sofie

  2. 2

    ChrisH said,

    Hi Jill and Ted

    Great blog. I’d like to invite you to join ‘Top Tree Sites’ .

    Top Tree Sites is a new directory of tree related websites that is ranked according to how many visitors sites get. It would be great to get some more interesting sites, such as yours, listed. Please do take a look and consider joining.

    Regards

    Chris

  3. 3

    Dear Ted and Jill,
    I hope you remember me. I’m an italian arborist. We met in Riccione (2005) were we had the chance to spend some time together talking about trees. Surfing internet i found a terrific video at the following URL:

    How it is possible that something so terrible can happen in England. Please tell me that it is not true or try to take an action.

    Best regards and Good Easter

    Marcello Parisini

    • 4

      Yes this is really terrible. PEople can let us know about Trees under threat on woodwatch pages and get info on how to campaign to prevent this in future. THanks for posting this.

  4. 5

    Zoe Sinclair said,

    Hi Jill & Ted

    I wondered if you might be able to use this news on your blog please? Online here http://www.artbournemouth.co.uk/section248319_92498.html.

    A parachute, giant balloons and fabric mushrooms – the installation of the ‘Cradle’ outdoor art exhibition in Bournemouth Lower Gardens begins in the trees on 22 April 2009.

    Three fine art students from the Arts Institute at Bournemouth are bringing their creations to the treetops of the Lower Gardens , with help from local tree surgeons Banyards, who are a sponsor of the annual group exhibition, opening on Saturday 25 April for ten days.

    On Wednesday 22 April, Banyards tree surgeon Will Jones will be spending the day up in the trees installing a parachute, giant balloons and fabric mushrooms – all in the name of art!

    Three student’s work for the exhibition has the common theme of using the trees as the setting for their new sculpture pieces.

    Elizabeth Green is putting giant balloons amongst the high branches of a Pine tree on Pine Walk, to represent colossal cells being nurtured and sustained by the healing force of a tree. In the 1800’s Pine Walk was named ‘Invalids Walk’ because the Pine trees along it were once thought to have curative powers.

    Fran Morris has been working with an army surplus parachute, cutting out pattern pieces from it to make figures which will be displayed seated on a park bench by the River Bourne, whilst the remaining parachute billows out in the tree above. Fran likes to explore the idea of restriction versus freedom and how these mean different things to all of us.

    Lizzie Latham’s work is based around an obscure short story, written by the artist, in which mushrooms fall from the sky and attach themselves onto peoples’ backs. Mushroom-like sculptures will be placed in three leaning trees in the gardens.

    “This is completely different to a normal day’s work for Banyards! Our tree surgeons would normally be carrying out selective works to trees for health and safety reasons, whilst ensuring that every precaution is taken to safe guard the health, growth, vigour and wellbeing of the tree to the highest arboricultural standards in the industry. It’s also a fantastic opportunity for our tree surgeons, whose absolute passion are trees, to assist in climbing for fun reasons to portray a serious message through art!” said Banyards Director Jim Edwards.

    Please let me know if you need more information.

    All the best,
    Zoe

  5. 6

    Wayne Farrell said,

    Many thanks to you both for an excellent stroll around Savernake today. Very useful information and great tales of historic trees was eagerly lapped up.

    I’ve taken a series of great photos which you may like to use for future publications or the blog – drop me aline if you’d like to see them and I can e-mail a selection.

    Many thanks!

  6. 7

    Johnnie said,

    Ted & Jill, if you send me your email no’ I’ll forward a pic’ of a huge birch (biggest in Britain?) 16ft 4in in circumference. I’m unable to give the location as I don’t think the estate (Highlands) would welcome dozens of tree huggers. A magnificent specimen, sound in limb, books tell you that birch lives for about a century!

  7. 8

    Johnnie said,

    Guys, how do I send you this picture, it really is a stoater! never been on a Blog before!

  8. 10

    Sonya Chasey said,

    An excellent blog for tree lovers!- I got here because I’m trying to find out how many different species a beech tree can support. Would you be able to tell me?

  9. 11

    Michele said,

    Hi,
    What a great website! I was wondering if you could help me… I have a favourite tree in Savernake Forest that is just incredible and I would like to identify it. It’s a little difficult, though, as it is covered in thick moss all over, I’ve never seen it flower and it does not have one discrete trunk…. there are five massive branches that seem to meet at a centre but then each grow to about 1 metre or less and twist off wildly, leaving a gap in the centre of the tree that a person can stand on. I am not sure if the leaves I see coming off various branches are actually from the mother tree or are from neighbouring trees that have reached it, or from parasitic plants ( there are ferns and other things growing out if the thick moss). My friends think it is a Hawthorne because it does have some thorns, but I have never seen fruit or flowers on it. Mind you, I often can’t find it during spring because it is surrounded by 5 – 6 ft high bracken and not near then main paths.

    Would I be able to send you a photo?
    Thanks

  10. 12

    Steve Bond said,

    Hello tree lovers

    These trees need looking at!

    http://www.hidingintheshadows.com/#!trees

    Enjoy

  11. 13

    Rosa said,

    Hi,
    What a great website! I was wondering if you could help me… I have a favourite tree in Savernake Forest that is just incredible and I would like to identify it. It’s a little difficult, though, as it is covered in thick moss all over, I’ve never seen it flower and it does not have one discrete trunk…. there are five massive branches that seem to meet at a centre but then each grow to about 1 metre or less and twist off wildly, leaving a gap in the centre of the tree that a person can stand on. I am not sure if the leaves I see coming off various branches are actually from the mother tree or are from neighbouring trees that have reached it, or from parasitic plants ( there are ferns and other things growing out if the thick moss). My friends think it is a Hawthorne because it does have some thorns, but I have never seen fruit or flowers on it. Mind you, I often can’t find it during spring because it is surrounded by 5 – 6 ft high bracken and not near then main paths.

    +1

    • 14

      Thanks Rosa – would love to help but a bit difficult from your description alone. It does sound like a hawthorn and there are some spectacular ones in Savernake. It should have thorny twigs, red berries and a nice smallish leaf. There are many on line id websites – why not look at http://www.britishtrees.org.uk and then see if the entry for hawthorn looks right

    • 15

      Dear Rosa

      Just been out to Savernake to visit a massive ancient hawthorn with 5 twisting limbs coming out of a central hollow area. It must be the same ‘tree’. It is a wonder of the world….

      Jill


Comment RSS · TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: